Barnsley South Yorkshire England

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Alex Shore - Music Tuition

20 Lynham Avenue
Birdwell
Barnsley, South Yorkshire S70 5SY
England

Private tuition in piano, music theory and music technology for all age ranges and abilities.

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Fortissimo School of Music

5 Cloverlands Drive
Staincross
Barnsley, South Yorkshire S75 6EB
England

Fortissimo School of Music - Inspiring Musical Minds

- Tuition is available on: Piano, Clarinet, Flute, Saxophone, Violin and Theory of Music

- ...

Fortissimo School of Music

5 Cloverlands Drive
Staincross
Barnsley, South Yorkshire S75 6EB
England

- Tuition is available on: Piano, Clarinet, Flute, Saxophone, Violin and Theory of Music

-çe

Gareth Green Music Rehearsal Rooms

15 Pashley Croft
Barnsley, South Yorkshire S73 0LD
England

We have two music studios available for hire @ £5 per hour. They are both modern, warm and well lit rooms, one with pleasant views across the garden ...

Gareth Green

15 Pashley Croft
Barnsley, South Yorkshire 73 0LD
England

Gareth offers lessons in a wide variety of musical areas. Tuition also available online over Skype.

Gareth Green Accompanist

15 Pashley Croft
Barnsley, South Yorkshire S73 0LD
England

Gareth works as a professional accompanist for piano and organ. All levels welcome. Offers Instrumental and Vocal coaching.

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Did You Know Piano Facts

1350
Towards the middle of the fourteenth century German wire smiths began drawing wire through steel plates, and this method continued until the beginning of the nineteenth century. Iron, gold, silver, brass, gut, horsehair and recently nylon have been used for strings on many different instruments. The earliest use of steel wire occurred in 1735 in Wales, but is not thought to have been used for the stringing of instruments. The Broadwood piano company stated that they were using steel wire in 1815 from Germany and Britain, but this has not been confirmed. According to the Oxford Companion, it was in 1819 that Brockedon began drawing steel wire through holes in diamonds and rubies. Before 1834 wire for instruments was made either from iron or brass, until Webster of Birmingham introduced steel wire. The firm seems to have been called Webster and Horsfall, but later the best wire is said to have come from Nuremberg and later still from Berlin. Wire has been plated in gold, silver, and platinum to stop rusting and plated wire can still be bought, but polished wire is best. In 1862 Broadwood claimed that a Broadwood grand would take a strain of about 17 tons, with the steel strings taking 150 pounds each. There had been many makers, but it was not until 1883 that the now-famous wire-making firm of Roslau began in West Germany. According to Wolfenden, by 1893 one firm claimed their wire had a breaking strain for gauge 13 of 325 pounds. The same maker gives some earlier dates for the breaking strain of gauge 13: 1867 - 226 pounds; 1873 - 232 pounds; 1876 - 265 pounds; and 1884 - 275 pounds. Wolfenden said:"These samples were, of course, specially drawn for competition and commercial wire of this gauge cannot even now be trusted to reach above 260 pounds."