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Mr N Troth MABPT Dip AEWVH


Birmingham, West Midlands B38 9AA
England

Tuning in Homes, Schools, Theatres and Concerts Venues. in West Midlands area

Dmitry Kormann


Birmingham, West Midlands B28 8DY
England

Looking to develop your musical and artistic skills and horizons, or willing to go through the grade system, or even just looking for a bit of a ...

Teagues Pianos

52 Elmdon Lane
Marston Green
Birmingham, West Midlands B37 7AU
England

We are a long established family business specialising in piano removals, trading since 1930 and are highly regarded by major piano manufacturers, the...

Academy Pianos

St. Francis Hall
Baccabox Lane
Birmingham, West Midlands B47 5DD
England

Buying the right piano is often a difficult task, I am here to help, whether you are choosing your first piano or upgrading to a better instrument.

Teagues Pianos Hire

52 Elmdon Lane
Birmingham, West Midlands B37 7AU
England

We cover the whole country for hire piano. We have a model B Steinway and Yamaha 6' 6" grand, we also hire uprights including a white Yamaha disklavia...

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Did You Know Piano Facts

1350
Towards the middle of the fourteenth century German wire smiths began drawing wire through steel plates, and this method continued until the beginning of the nineteenth century. Iron, gold, silver, brass, gut, horsehair and recently nylon have been used for strings on many different instruments. The earliest use of steel wire occurred in 1735 in Wales, but is not thought to have been used for the stringing of instruments. The Broadwood piano company stated that they were using steel wire in 1815 from Germany and Britain, but this has not been confirmed. According to the Oxford Companion, it was in 1819 that Brockedon began drawing steel wire through holes in diamonds and rubies. Before 1834 wire for instruments was made either from iron or brass, until Webster of Birmingham introduced steel wire. The firm seems to have been called Webster and Horsfall, but later the best wire is said to have come from Nuremberg and later still from Berlin. Wire has been plated in gold, silver, and platinum to stop rusting and plated wire can still be bought, but polished wire is best. In 1862 Broadwood claimed that a Broadwood grand would take a strain of about 17 tons, with the steel strings taking 150 pounds each. There had been many makers, but it was not until 1883 that the now-famous wire-making firm of Roslau began in West Germany. According to Wolfenden, by 1893 one firm claimed their wire had a breaking strain for gauge 13 of 325 pounds. The same maker gives some earlier dates for the breaking strain of gauge 13: 1867 - 226 pounds; 1873 - 232 pounds; 1876 - 265 pounds; and 1884 - 275 pounds. Wolfenden said:"These samples were, of course, specially drawn for competition and commercial wire of this gauge cannot even now be trusted to reach above 260 pounds."