Northamptonshire England

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Jacinta Patricia Holden LRSM (Piano Performer) LTCL (Piano Teacher)


Brackley, Northamptonshire
England

Professionally qualified. LRSM Performer:Licentiate Royal Schools of Music UK; and LTCL Teacher: Licentiate Trinity College London. Over 30 years ...

Alltranz Ltd

1 Lindrick Close
Daventry, Northamptonshire NN11 4SN
England

Moving a piano is a specialist skill. It's not just that your instrument may be valuable, it will undoubtedly be precious and personal to you and you'...

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JOSEFS PIANOS

5 Bridge St
Kettering, Northamptonshire NN14 6EW
England

As a family business, we have specialised in supplying pianos for over 30 years now. They have become part of our way of life! We sell both new and ...

LSM Piano Removals


Northampton, Northamptonshire NN4 8JH
England

Fully insured piano removals throughout the UK and Europe

LSM Pianos Ltd

9 Rothersthorpe Avenue
Rothersthorpe Ind. Estate
Northampton, Northamptonshire NN4 8JH
England

LSM Pianos Ltd. was established back in 1979. We sell our own range of Halle & Voight pianos both to the retail and trade markets along with the ...

Anita Swales

33 Denbigh Road
Northampton, Northamptonshire NN3 3HF
England

I teach the piano for all ages and abilities.

Karen Hicks Piano

19 New street
Earls barton
Northampton, Northamptonshire Nn6 0nn
England

Friendly and patient piano teacher, 17 years experience.

LSM Pianos Hire

Unit 9 Rothersthorpe Ave
Northampton, Northamptonshire NN4 8JH
England

Nationwide coverage 110cm uprights upto Yamaha C7 Grand Short or long term Older styles available for Theatre,TV and Photographic use

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Did You Know Piano Facts

Concert Pitch
What is Standard Pitch or Concert Pitch and why do we need it? Standard Pitch is a universal frequency or note that all instruments are set to. TodayĆ­s standard pitch is A440 or C523.3 and this concert pitch enables musicians to play instruments together in harmony. A form of standard pitch has been around ever since two individuals wished to play two instruments together or sing to an instrument. A tuning fork is normally used to set the pitch. However, in the past, pitch pipes have been used, and today electronic tuning forks are also used, but the most common is the tuning fork. The tuning fork was invented by John Shore in 1711 and it had a pitch of A423.5. He was the sergeant trumpeter to the Court and also lutenist in the Chapel Royal.
Of course, once you have your "A" or "C" set to a pitch, the rest of the instrument will have to be tuned. A scale is set in the middle and this scale also determines the pitch of all the twelve notes in the octave. The most common system used to day is known as equal temperament. This sets the pitches of the twelve notes so that the player can play the instrument in all keys by dividing the roughness equally among the twelve notes. The roughness is called the "wolf." This term may have come about because if the "wolf" is not set right the instrument will be howling out of tune.
Like standard pitch A440, equal temperament is not the only tuning scale that has been used. Ptolemy started using just intonation in 136 AD. Meantone tuning was perfected by Salinas in 1577 AD. Equal temperament was proposed by Aristoxenus, a pupil of Aristotle, and had been in use in China for some centuries before. It would seem that equal temperament was used in North Germany as early as 1690. In 1842 the organ of St. Nicholas, in Newcastle-upon-Tyne, was tuned to equal temperament, and this is believed to be the first organ to be tuned in this way in England for a concert. Willis the organ builder did not use equal temperament until 1854. However, in 1846 Walter Broadwood directed Mr. Hipkins the head piano tuner at the company to instruct their tuners in the use of equal temperament. Mr. Hipkins used two tuning forks, one for meantone at A433.5 and one for equal temperament at A436. Meantone was the most common scale used at that time. See Ed Foote for more information on the use of meantone on today's pianos.
Musicians are not the only people to work with pitch. In 583 BC, a Greek philosopher called Pythagorus was making use of the monochord. This device is simply a soundbox with a single string stretched over a movable bridge, the position of which can be determined by a scale marked on the soundbox. This was more of a scientific instrument than a musical one. Before this time, the Egyptians and Greeks made use of the monochord. For 5000 years, it was used to make intricate mathematical calculations. The ratio of intervals and many other facts that make up the fundamentals of acoustic science were discovered using the monochord. Pythagorus used a pitch of 256Hz on his monochord. The study of mathematics was known as philosophy in the time of Plato.