Mr Barrie Heaton Dip. AEWVH, FABPT, FIMIT, CGLI (hon.), MMPTA (usa), MUEPB,. Reviews

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5 of 5 from 1 reviews.

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 STECK baby grand, 17-04-2017 02:33PM

By: Kevin Kearns

It is a pleasure to report that a service received exceeded one’s most optimistic hopes and expectations - Barrie’s work on the repair and tuning of an elderly STECK baby grand certainly warrants this accolade. The piano appears to be about a hundred years old and it had, to say the least, been neglected – indeed over the last six years it had been located in an unoccupied property. Apart from the many other problems which required attention, a large number of the keytops had become displaced and attempts had been made to re-fix them with an inappropriate adhesive.

None of this phased Barrie. He took the Action to his workshop; he replaced all the keytops and undertook all the required repairs. Within three weeks Barrie had completed this work; he then reinstalled the Action, cleaned the frame to its former glory and tuned the piano.

This was a challenging undertaking, which Barrie completed with consummate professional skill – and considerable good humour. To say that his client is delighted, would be a very substantial understatement. One was fortunate to have had him recommended by a professional in his own field. Barrie has earned appreciation and the warmest thanks of all concerned in this project.

Kevin Kearns

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Did You Know Piano Facts

1711
John Shore was the inventor of the tuning fork. He became a royal trumpeter in 1688 and rose to sergeant trumpeter in 1708. He was also lutenist to the Chapel Royal, appointed in 1706. A lute is aguitar-like instrument with a long neck and a pear-shaped body,much used in the fourteenth to seventeenth centuries. The instrument is notoriously difficult to keep in tune, and Shore devised the tuning fork to help him tune his lute. He died in 1752.