Hurstwood Farm Piano Studios

Hurstwood Farm Piano Studios

Hurstwood Farm Piano Studios near Sevenoaks in Kent

 
 
 
About Us
 
 
 
Hurstwood Farm Piano Studios near Sevenoaks in Kent is the place where pianists and piano music lovers can find the ultimate in piano quality and excellence. Recitals are given in our own recital hall by some of the Worlds leading artists on a selection of concert grand's  from the finest available of their make.
 
There is a display of some thirty new and used pianos by the acknowledged top manufacturers. All these instruments are honed to perfection by our appointed technician Doug Chapman.
 
We pride ourselves that:
  • We offer some of the lowest prices in Europe for some of the finest quality pianos available. We do this by combining a large turnover with highly efficient management methods and top quality technical skills.
  • We can give the highest possible standard of piano presentation and after sales service.
  • Informed, open, reliable and experienced advice and assistance is always available for visitors whether they be top professional, serious amateur or learner pianists.
  • We offer superb and modestly priced recital and recording facilities where some of the best technology in the world for piano recording on several makes of concert instrument is available at below market rates. For young pianists, recording may be offered at no cost under sponsorship arrangements.
  • We can accommodate our clients at their convenience by appointment. Please telephone 01732 885050.

Contact Information

  • The Hurst Crouch
    Borough Green
    Sevenoaks, Kent TN15 8TA
    England
  • Phone: View Phone
  • Send Message vCard

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Other Information

Other Categories:

Piano Shops

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Did You Know Piano Facts

1350
Towards the middle of the fourteenth century German wire smiths began drawing wire through steel plates, and this method continued until the beginning of the nineteenth century. Iron, gold, silver, brass, gut, horsehair and recently nylon have been used for strings on many different instruments. The earliest use of steel wire occurred in 1735 in Wales, but is not thought to have been used for the stringing of instruments. The Broadwood piano company stated that they were using steel wire in 1815 from Germany and Britain, but this has not been confirmed. According to the Oxford Companion, it was in 1819 that Brockedon began drawing steel wire through holes in diamonds and rubies. Before 1834 wire for instruments was made either from iron or brass, until Webster of Birmingham introduced steel wire. The firm seems to have been called Webster and Horsfall, but later the best wire is said to have come from Nuremberg and later still from Berlin. Wire has been plated in gold, silver, and platinum to stop rusting and plated wire can still be bought, but polished wire is best. In 1862 Broadwood claimed that a Broadwood grand would take a strain of about 17 tons, with the steel strings taking 150 pounds each. There had been many makers, but it was not until 1883 that the now-famous wire-making firm of Roslau began in West Germany. According to Wolfenden, by 1893 one firm claimed their wire had a breaking strain for gauge 13 of 325 pounds. The same maker gives some earlier dates for the breaking strain of gauge 13: 1867 - 226 pounds; 1873 - 232 pounds; 1876 - 265 pounds; and 1884 - 275 pounds. Wolfenden said:"These samples were, of course, specially drawn for competition and commercial wire of this gauge cannot even now be trusted to reach above 260 pounds."