polyester scratches

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pianolad23
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polyester scratches

Post by pianolad23 » 07 Aug 2005, 15:54

What is the best stuff for using to get surface scratches out of black polyester on my Yamaha U1 ? they arent major and havent gone through the laquer, i was gonna try Tcut but thought id better ask first!

Gill the Piano
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Post by Gill the Piano » 07 Aug 2005, 18:57

I reckon you'd better wait till Barrie's finished basting himself with butter (and beer) in Benidorm! 8) :lol:

pianolad23
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Post by pianolad23 » 07 Aug 2005, 20:00

LOL ok thanks Gill

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piano scratches

Post by Madasafish » 06 Dec 2007, 18:54

i also have a black yamaha u1 with some fine scratches on the lid - has not gone through the lacquer but it does show up as fine white lines - did you have any success with your quest for the best way to get rid of these or hide them?

thanks

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Barrie Heaton
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Post by Barrie Heaton » 06 Dec 2007, 22:10

Buff-Brite is good at removing surface scratches but we sold out in a few days of putting it up. We have some on order This stuff protects polyester High Gloss Piano Polish

I am getting some touch up pens for polyester as well I will test them before we put them up to see if they are any good

If you want some one to fix a scratch then look hear Polyester Repair Companies

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Openwood
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Post by Openwood » 07 Dec 2007, 12:43

Those tiny scratches seem to generate themselves at random! I don't really like the polyester finish for exactly that reason, and also because it shows up every single finger print clear as anything. Unfortunately it's also the cheapest finish (isn't it? I think that's the case) .

The C7, P114 and U1 at the school where I work are all victims of the invisible scratch monster. I've tried buff brite, T-something (for cars!) and other stuff but nothing really seems to work.

Never mind, worse things happen at sea, apparently.

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Barrie Heaton
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Post by Barrie Heaton » 07 Dec 2007, 18:35

Openwood wrote:Those tiny scratches seem to generate themselves at random! I don't really like the polyester finish for exactly that reason, and also because it shows up every single finger print clear as anything. Unfortunately it's also the cheapest finish (isn't it? I think that's the case) .
blame your cleaners they tend to use the wrong type of duster and often with grit on them they can make very deep scratches which will take quite a bit of elbow work to get them out

its not the cheapest finish by a long way, open pore mat is the cheapest finish to apply and maintain

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sussexpianos
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Post by sussexpianos » 08 Dec 2007, 11:46

The only answer to remove scratches it to create scratches but to make them smaller and smaller until you can not see the scratches ( unless you have a microscope).
Polyester is a modern finish so its very hard wearing and general polish is not going to get rid of a scratch.
Black T-cut is a mild abrasive which with some elbow grease, should remove the marks. use the black as if you haven't managed to get the scratch out completly, your not going to have a white mark when the cream dries.
For stubon scratches, if you think your upto it, use a paste called G3 ( you can get this from autopaint suppliers or motor factors)with a wet rag. use it for small areas and keep it wet. Follow this by using the T-cut and you should have a good shiny finish.
Please bear in mind that black will show up minor scratches more than clear polyester so don't be so criticle. use Micro fibre cloths ( good quality ones).
The best liquid polish for polyester is Kronig but only specalists places sell this. There are other ways using kronig stuff but its not for amaters.
Polyester pen (they only do black) is OK for colouring small chips on the side of pianos or edges, its not for scratches, especialy on flat areas.
I have been repairing polyester for a few years and I hate the stuff. The best finish for school pianos is matt finish which is open grained. This is easy to repair.(except when someone uses a knife to put their lovers name on it)
If you want a polyester finish, use black as polyester repair kits have a yellow tint where black is black. White is the worse to repair, I have to use touch up bottles over the repair because the resin with white looks awful.

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Re: polyester scratches

Post by Stevechristian » 30 Sep 2014, 17:22

Hi. I have a U3 I want to sell which has the usual small chips from kids toys etc. I can't find anyone in yorkshire at all willing to touch them up for me, however I am quite handy! Can you run me through where I can get these touch up pens (fletchernewman?) and the procedure for the repair and Lacquer if there is any?
Thanks! That would be greatly appreciated. Steve

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Colin Nicholson
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Re: polyester scratches

Post by Colin Nicholson » 01 Oct 2014, 23:47

Where in Yorkshire are you? .... I might be able to help.

Poly repairs for dents, chips, cracks etc are generally uneconomical for a bespoke repair if selling a piano.
Best used to after buying/ resto project/ general repairs. Polyester kits ate quite expensive.

The repair kits are available (in 2 different ways) including resins, hardener, 2-pAck resins, tools, buffers and creams etc. The kits are usually a 'one-off' purchase (usually caused by low demand), unless a technician specifically deals in that field. Also some of the resins, once opened, have a short shelf life.... so that's one reason some polishers don't get too involved with small repairs.

Also, lacquer is not used - its a clear resin - much thicker.

I have had several phone calls for poly repairs, and each one requiring extensive repairs to the main cabinet areas, such as the cheek corners/ legs/ feet.... so the piano has to be taken away, especially if the piano is over 50 miles away.... customers usually want an on-site service, but that won't happen. The advanced kit, including repairs and some labour starts around the £200 mark.... quite expensive if you are selling up? Worth it if the piano is relatively new. If parts can be taken away, it is much easier to deal with in a workshop environment.

This work is along the lines of restoring & stripping down a gearbox.... specialised, so we do not usually give out various instructions, especially here on the forum. I myself could order a kit for a customer, and there are instructions included, but we usually prefer to do the repairs ourselves.... like a gearbox engineer!

A touch-up pen is as it says.... I've never known one repair chips, or a pen specifically for poly repairs.... not heard of.
Depending on the location of the chips, (corner edges/ edge trims/ centre panel etc.) .... some will not bring the piano back to 100% - unless the whole piano is sent away and completely repolished.

It also depends on if you wish to pay the price for these repairs, and the distance you, or the technician would have to travel to reach the piano?? .... possibly taking the parts away and returning (that would be my recommendation)
Parts like the fallboard, front panel, music rest etc can easily be removed and taken away. The kits are available on the trade market only, and available through a piano technician + commission.

If you are selling the piano, I do a pretty good repair job using different materials & methods.... but I do the job myself, and its much cheaper than a poly repair. Depends on location/ access and how far you wish to go. You may find the odd local tuners in your area do not do this work, so you may need to look further afield.

Hope that helps........ :)

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athomik
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Re: polyester scratches

Post by athomik » 05 Feb 2015, 19:29

www.konig-uk.co.uk do some of Koenig stuff which is very good, but the UK online shop doesn't list all the bits they do in Germany. I rember getting spaced out on their polyester repair kit after using it for 4 days in a ( obviously) not sufficiently ventilated workshop. I'm just trying to track down a replacement for my 'Decklack Pinsel fix intense black' polyester touch up pen but, it seems, they now only do Jet Black.
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