Are Bluthner strings really known to be problematic?

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PossiblePianist
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Are Bluthner strings really known to be problematic?

Post by PossiblePianist » 12 Jul 2019, 19:54

I am hoping to replace two (bass) strings on my Bluthner concert grand.

My tuner took one of each of the existing strings of the relevant notes and had copies made. On fitting, they broke. He had more made, which also broke (these latter breakages also occurred while he was fitting them).

He said that, on reflection, he had heard that Bluthner strings were problematic.

Is this generally known/thought to be the case?

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Barrie Heaton
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Re: Are Bluthner strings really known to be problematic?

Post by Barrie Heaton » 12 Jul 2019, 20:52

Yes, Bluthner strings can be a pain manly Bluthners that were made in former East Germany scaling is very close to the BS. But a new string should come up. He/she may have to tell the string maker to make the string a tad thinner so they will come up However, all 4 will need to be changed or they will be a miss match.


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Re: Are Bluthner strings really known to be problematic?

Post by PossiblePianist » 13 Jul 2019, 19:56

Yes, I haven't been able to track it down, but, judging from the "prizes" sticker on the soundboard, I'm guessing it's from the 1920s.

I've got a bit more guessing to do, this time about your reply. "BS" is "British Standard"?

Hmm, I thought that was why he took strings with him, so that the maker could get the size exactly right. Bluthner are now involved since the original chap has now decided he wants to have nothing more to do with it.

Why would they need to be thinner? To get through the eyes at the keyboard end? I wondered if it was pressure there that was causing them to break, but I'd assumed, if that was the reason, it was because there was some rough metal in the eye scraping the string, although it sounded like a far fetched idea. That might've explained why the original two strings weren't there, but not why subsequent strings in the other positions broke.

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Re: Are Bluthner strings really known to be problematic?

Post by Barrie Heaton » 13 Jul 2019, 23:56

PossiblePianist wrote:
13 Jul 2019, 19:56
Yes, I haven't been able to track it down, but, judging from the "prizes" sticker on the soundboard, I'm guessing it's from the 1920s.
Give them the serial number and they will date it for you

PossiblePianist wrote:
13 Jul 2019, 19:56
I've got a bit more guessing to do, this time about your reply. "BS" is "British Standard"?
Breaking Strain

PossiblePianist wrote:
13 Jul 2019, 19:56
Why would they need to be thinner?
lower tension needed on a thin string to achieve the correct pitch

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