George Rogers upright

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Mick Coggins
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George Rogers upright

Post by Mick Coggins » 29 May 2019, 09:09

Dear All,

I have a G Rogers & Sons London Serial 13484 upright piano walnut inlaid with 2 double sconces. I purchased it in about 1995 from a antique shop in Coventry who informed me that it had been in a Public School. The Serial number is 13484 and I was informed by a website about 20 years ago that the manufacture date was 1888. It has been professionally refurbished and is not bad to play although some of the action takes a bit of getting used to. Tuned to a quarter of a tone below modern concert pitch which I believe only started in the 1920s as it would put too much strain on the frame to tune to concert pitch. I wonder whether you could refer me to a website/company that can obtain the original sale record of the piano at about this time and the purchasers name and anything more about it. I am willing to pay for such a report.

Mick Coggins
Rothwell, Northamptonshire
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G Rogers & Sons London 13484 upright piano 2.JPG
G Rogers & Sons London 13484 upright piano 1.JPG
G Rogers & Sons London 13484 upright piano 1.JPG

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Bill Kibby
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Re: George Rogers upright walnut inlaid piano

Post by Bill Kibby » 29 May 2019, 10:47

My Archives page
http://www.pianohistory.info/archives.html
explains that very few piano makers' archives have survived, and I am not aware of any for Rogers, so the kind of information you are hoping for is simply not available for most pianos. Dating a piano purely on the basis of numbers is often not as simple as it seems, but 1888 seems possible. General information on Victorian uprights may be found at
http://www.pianohistory.info/victorian.html
and it explains that the 1880s was a period of experimenting, evolving from Cottage Pianos to the more familiar uprights. What you have been told about pitch is misleading, and any piano you find outside a museum will have been made capable of tuning to A440, but a lot depends on its condition, and raising it in one tuning is risky.
Piano History Centre
http://pianohistory.info
Email bill@pianohistory.info
If you find old references or links on this site to pianogen.org, alter these to pianohistory.info

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