NUTTING piano age?

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devinayanna
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NUTTING piano age?

Post by devinayanna » 18 Jan 2019, 06:52

I currently have an upright piano with I believe possibly candle holder mounting? (in decent condition, previous owners were good to it, but it needs love), and can't seem to find any info on it. I am considering restoring it, but not sure if its worth trying to. It says as followed:
GEO. NUTTING & CO
MAKERS TO THE ROYAL FAMILY
NO.74, GREAT TITCHFIELD STREET, LONDON

What I have found is that ownership of the company seemed to change hands like crazy. Anyone have an knowledge on Nutting and co? or maybe help getting an age ? thank you !
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Bill Kibby
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George Nutting

Post by Bill Kibby » 18 Jan 2019, 14:54

Thank you for having the common sense to show us what the WHOLE piano looks like! Yes, it was quite common for London piano firms to have frequent changes in partners, resulting in changes in the company name. To make it worse, the names often overlapped for years.

NUTTING COMPANY NAMES
In the early 1800s, the company was Gunther & Nutting.
Around 1817, the pianos bore the name of James Nutting.
In the 1820s it was Nutting & Henderson.
In the 1840s and 1850s, it was Nutting & Wood.
1843 Nutting & Wood began at 74 Great Tichfield Street. Interestingly, the spelling seems to be wrong!
In the 1850s, there was also George Nutting.
1875 Nutting & Norminton, 15 Nottingham Mews, Marylebone W.
From the 1850s to the early 1900s, it was Nutting & Addison.

NUTTING COMPANY NAMES included…

NUTTING & ADDISON, LONDON
NUTTING & ADDISON, London
NUTTING & HENDERSON, LONDON
NUTTING & NORMINTON, LONDON
NUTTING & WOOD, London
NUTTING (George) & ADDISON (Robert)
NUTTING (George) & Co., LONDON
NUTTING (GUNTHER &) London
NUTTING (James Lindop)
NUTTING (James) & Co., London
NUTTING (James) & HENDERSON, London
NUTTING with COVENTRY, BARNETT & ADDISON
NUTTING with GUNTHER
NUTTING, ADDISON & Co., London

This is a typical Victorian Cottage Piano, before 1885 as explained at
http://www.pianohistory.info/victorian.html
so have a look at that page for clues. Bearing in mind the address, it might have been made close to the 1860s, but if the solid wood top panel is original, this suggest something nearer 1880. I will continue to look for clues!
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devinayanna
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Re: I can't seem to find out how old this piano is, any advice?

Post by devinayanna » 19 Jan 2019, 07:03

Just want to say thank you again for sending the link you did! It was very informative. Based on the link, I believe you are correct about the possible dates for age. Ive attached some photos to see what anyone thinks. I don't believe its older than 1885, but I'd love to know if anyone has any other insight, or if you may have discovered anything. Also is it worth it to restore? or is this a overly common piano ? Would it be more lucrative to try to buy a already restored piano? thanks again!
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NUTTING piano

Post by Bill Kibby » 19 Jan 2019, 12:13

I can't tell you what it is worth wherever you live, but here in the UK, I'm afraid the word "lucrative" doesn't come into it with these, the most common Victorian pianos, and they are rarely worth the cost of restoration, and although some people do it for the love, or to preserve history, sadly many are scrapped. As for the date, cottage pianos went out in the 1880s, and the style of this is not as late as that, I guess 1860s. By the 1870s, I think it is fair to say they all had 85 notes.
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If you find old references or links on this site to pianogen.org, they should refer to pianohistory.info

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