"Max's cardboard fix"

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TheMaximillyan
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"Max's cardboard fix"

Post by TheMaximillyan » 13 May 2018, 15:29

Previously, many piano technicians laughed at Max, who suggested using corrugated cardboard for a lost pin. Kostya professional tuner from the Urals took a video about this material. What has changed now? Kostya made a testimony of the device, it's shows that the pin's friction high occurs 1.5 times.
Russian tuner kindly agreed to do the experiment using a special hammer wrench with a dynamometer.
Before a setting "Max's cardboard fix" the device shows that pin has (clockwise 7.2 against 2.4)
After a setting "Max's cardboard fix" readings from the device where (clockwise: 11,8 against : 6,2)
Next, he takes readings where his method is used, "a fix using insulating electrical cardboard " where before setting it’s:
(clockwise:7.3 against : 2,4 )
After a setting "a fix using insulating electrical cardboard "
(clockwise:15.0 against : 7,8 )

https://youtu.be/UAs23zj7Sb4



Conclusion: in some cases it is possible and necessary to use cardboard, I think

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Re: "Max's cardboard fix"

Post by Barrie Heaton » 13 May 2018, 16:33

Why not hammer the pin in. instead of turning the pin in a hard way.

It's nothing new just a different material I use veneer

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Re: "Max's cardboard fix"

Post by TheMaximillyan » 14 May 2018, 09:58

All new is well forgotten old. Why cardboard and no hammer the pin in?
1 Old pinblock where often not only a hole, but has bush have big destroyed. In moment we have hard hammering, we may destroy holes in the pinblock.
2 A simple layman can do this perfectly if he has T-bar socket tuning lever
3 Cardboard is chosen neither accidentally. It's thickness of 3 mm is partially destroyed at the time of torsion (screwing) and the fibers of the paper fill friable microcracks it's .
3 quality hammering of a pin so that the pin is installed can making professional tuner only, I'm think

https://youtu.be/pOBwn2odX-g?list=PLDD6668CC75A16250
Cardboard shim for loose tuning pin:

This is a cost-effective method of fixing a loose tuning pin. It avoids de-tuning adjacent strings, which can happen with methods that involve hammering tuning pins in.

First, turn the tuning pin enough to slacken the string coils. Then, using a narrow (but strong) screwdriver or an awl, lever the end of the string out of the tuning pin hole. (This point in the string is called the 'becket'). Lever against the tuning pin itself to prise the string out.

Now unscrew the tuning pin completely, leaving the string and coils in place. From some corrugated cardboard about 2mm or 3mm thick, cut a piece 20mm by 50mm. Insert this strip into the tuning pin hole (It may be helpful to curve the cardboard round a screwdriver shaft first, to make it easier to insert into the tuning pin hole). Firmly start the tuning pin into the hole, with the cardboard shim in place. Carefully turn the tuning pin into the hole, going quite slowly so as to avoid a build-up of heat. Turn the pin all the way in, to the same level as before.

Carefully insert the end of the string (the 'becket') back into the tuning pin hole, using suitable pliers. Make sure that the string coils are kept tight, using a stringing hook or a screwdriver.

Tune the string to pitch. The cardboard shim method will keep the pin tight for years and does not involve glue.
This English translation kindly made Scotland technician David Boyce

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Re: "Max's cardboard fix"

Post by Gill the Piano » 14 May 2018, 15:50

More to the point why should such a young piano (Petrof?) have loose tuning pins?
I play for my own amazement... :piano;

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Re: "Max's cardboard fix"

Post by TheMaximillyan » 14 May 2018, 16:18

Gill the Piano wrote:
14 May 2018, 15:50
More to the point why should such a young piano (Petrof?) have loose tuning pins?
No. It's own home piano that tuner (Kostya).
But we making this technique operation especially oldest Soviet piano. And it's work best.
Old upright piano "BELARUS"
https://youtu.be/--slQtf7H_c?list=PLDD6668CC75A16250

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Re: "Max's cardboard fix"

Post by Barrie Heaton » 14 May 2018, 19:53

Gill the Piano wrote:
14 May 2018, 15:50
More to the point why should such a young piano (Petrof?) have loose tuning pins?
The old Petrofs of the 80 wer not that good not as bad as the Belarus pianos we use to import them in the 80s seemed like they had oval tuning pins when you tried to tune them a nightmare Bass string overlapped the next tuning pin as well

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Re: "Max's cardboard fix"

Post by Gill the Piano » 15 May 2018, 16:24

Did Belarus pianos sometimes have no name on the fall? I tune an unbadged Russian piano - not bad! - but the only words I can discern are 'student' and 'diplom' on a transfer on the frame.
I play for my own amazement... :piano;

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Re: "Max's cardboard fix"

Post by TheMaximillyan » 16 May 2018, 13:29

Gill the Piano wrote:
15 May 2018, 16:24
Did Belarus pianos sometimes have no name on the fall? I tune an unbadged Russian piano - not bad! - but the only words I can discern are 'student' and 'diplom' on a transfer on the frame.
fall board desk? Always marking "Беларусь "
On the iron plate have "диплом 2 степени " It's piano "Ukraina" or "ЧЕРНИГОВ"

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Re: "Max's cardboard fix"

Post by TheMaximillyan » 16 May 2018, 13:33

Barrie Heaton wrote:
14 May 2018, 19:53
Gill the Piano wrote:
14 May 2018, 15:50
More to the point why should such a young piano (Petrof?) have loose tuning pins?
The old Petrofs of the 80 wer not that good not as bad as the Belarus pianos we use to import them in the 80s seemed like they had oval tuning pins when you tried to tune them a nightmare Bass string overlapped the next tuning pin as well

Barrie
And also the difference in thickness of the bushes and oval holes of a pinblock

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Re: "Max's cardboard fix"

Post by Gill the Piano » 16 May 2018, 18:13

Ah, so THAT'S what 'chernigov' meant ! I thought it was a manufacturer. Thanks,Max!
I play for my own amazement... :piano;

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Re: "Max's cardboard fix"

Post by TheMaximillyan » 17 May 2018, 01:25

Gill the Piano wrote:
16 May 2018, 18:13
Ah, so THAT'S what 'chernigov' meant ! I thought it was a manufacturer. Thanks,Max!
Don't mention it!

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Re: "Max's cardboard fix"

Post by maxim_tuner » 23 Jun 2018, 04:42

Barrie Heaton wrote:
13 May 2018, 16:33
Why not hammer the pin in. instead of turning the pin in a hard way.

It's nothing new just a different material I use veneer

Barrie
but Ilya using cardboard shim. He setted several that shim on his old upright piano "KUZBASS"
https://youtu.be/LjN3XaXp1S4

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