returning to piano - 2000 to spend? Help!

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millie
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returning to piano - 2000 to spend? Help!

Post by millie » 10 Feb 2008, 15:28

I played the piano as a child and got my grade 8 when I was 15, but then stopped playing entirely by the age of 17 or so. I'm now 36 and keen to start again. I know this is a topic done to death on this forum, but can you help me about which pianos I should be looking at? I have a budget of around £2,000 - based in north Manchester - have no idea what sort of thing I should be looking for (lots of pianos well within my price range say ideal starter piano, and I'm not sure if that is something that's suitable for me or not...).
I suppose my real question is can I get something that I will enjoy playing once I get rid of the rustiness for £2,000; should I be looking new or second hand; or should I save up for something more expensive?

thanks so much in advance!

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Post by Brumtuner » 10 Feb 2008, 19:02

In my opinion, a 1928 Broadwood (88 notes) would be ideal and yup, I just happen to have one of those for sale!

To you, £1999.50.

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Post by Brumtuner » 10 Feb 2008, 19:03

&pound = Quid

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Barrie Heaton
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Re: returning to piano - 2000 to spend? Help!

Post by Barrie Heaton » 10 Feb 2008, 22:41

millie wrote: I suppose my real question is can I get something that I will enjoy playing once I get rid of the rustiness for £2,000; should I be looking new or second hand; or should I save up for something more expensive?

thanks so much in advance!
Not new at that price unless you go for a new one from a retailer that has a buy back scheme when you upgrade. if you buy in the 112 range of pianos which is manly in the £2000 price range you will be disappointed later on.

Secondhand is going to be your best bet but I would add £1000 the usual Yams and Kwi's come to mind but there are other makes out there but take a little more looking for

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millie
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Post by millie » 10 Feb 2008, 23:12

thank you Barrie - the obvious examples from my trawling of the internet are U1s and U3s - is there any real difference between the two so far as I should be concerned? What I really need to do is get out there and actually play some, isn't it (though that's rather nerve-wracking after all these years!)

brumtuner - not sure if that is a serious reply or not! I am wary of older pianos, I guess because with the newer ones it is far more a case of what you see is what you get - and I know very little indeed about piano technicalities. I'm learning though
:D

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Post by Brumtuner » 11 Feb 2008, 00:04

"with the newer ones it is far more a case of what you see is what you get"

Exactly, that's why I prefer 1920's Broadwoods, Chappells etc.

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Post by PianoGuy » 11 Feb 2008, 00:30

A perfect 1920s Broadwood or Chappell would be a gorgeous thing (apart from the infamous Colon-Broadwood of course! ;-) ) but with old pianos, condition and standard of restoration become an issue. Factor in their lack of resistance to central heating and absence of any form of reference table for value, and they become instantly less appealing.

I would go for modern.

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Post by Barrie Heaton » 11 Feb 2008, 20:27

millie wrote:thank you Barrie - the obvious examples from my trawling of the internet are U1s and U3s - is there any real difference between the two so far as I should be concerned? What I really need to do is get out there and actually play some, isn't it (though that's rather nerve-wracking after all these years!)
:D
Yes there is, the U3 will have a fuller bass providing the strings are in good condition, the action is better than the U1 as well. In a small room the U1 is less imposing

I would not be to concerned about playing the piano if you feel intimidated ether take a friend who can play or just play scales the sales folk don't care one way or the other.

If you are buying private then take a tuner as U1 and 3 can very quite a lot from the same year. its best to stay above 4 million but there are some very nice 2 million ones out there but they tend to have more problems

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Post by millie » 11 Feb 2008, 22:42

thank you Barrie... am planning a trip a short way down the M66 to Prestwich!

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