Advice on digital pianos needed

General discussion about digital pianos

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ab2383
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Advice on digital pianos needed

Post by ab2383 » 25 Apr 2007, 22:01

Can anyone recommend a good digital piano to buy. I have a budget of about £2000.

I currently have a Broadwood upright which is about 45 years old and has been well used. I'd really like to buy a grand piano but living in an average size modern house (and having kids) this isn't really an option. So I am wondering about buying a digital model instead - would this give me the sound of a grand piano? I am short of space and the piano needs to go in the study, where the computer is, so the idea of being able to practise silently is very attractive. I am Grade VII so not looking for a beginner or entry model.

Went to look at a Roland today - HP107, in local music shop. How does this compare with say a Yamaha? Or would I need to spend more than this to get a model comparable with an accoustic piano? Any advice would be really appreciated - thanks.

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Barrie Heaton
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Post by Barrie Heaton » 26 Apr 2007, 18:33

Only you can decide if the keyboard is as good as a real piano However, two things you have to consider; the touch, the pedals. None of them have got the sustain pedal to sound like the real thing. On touch, the ones with a real action are the best but like real actions they need to be regulated for time to time.


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A440
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digital piano

Post by A440 » 10 May 2007, 01:08

Anyone above grade 5 should have a real piano.
You need to look at silent pianos to meet your needs.
Maybe try Yamaha or Kemble Silent systems. Then you have a real piano and a digital with real wood keys. The digital works out quite cheap really, and you have everything in one box.
DON'T LIVE YOUR LIFE FOR YOUR NEIGHBOUR. IF THEY DON'T APPRECIATE PIANO THEN F*** THEM!

cothse
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Re: digital piano

Post by cothse » 25 Dec 2007, 06:05

A440 wrote:Anyone above grade 5 should have a real piano.
You need to look at silent pianos to meet your needs.
Maybe try Yamaha or Kemble Silent systems. Then you have a real piano and a digital with real wood keys. The digital works out quite cheap really, and you have everything in one box.
DON'T LIVE YOUR LIFE FOR YOUR NEIGHBOUR. IF THEY DON'T APPRECIATE PIANO THEN F*** THEM!
Awesome!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silent_piano
http://www.yamaha.co.jp/english/product ... ilent.html
Pianos are such dignified instruments - they're either upright or grand!
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enigma
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Post by enigma » 21 Jan 2008, 18:43

when you say the real action keys need to be regulated, what do you mean? I mean is it anything like tuning? I hope this is not an ignorant question, but I'm also new to the digital piano stuff.

Barrie Heaton wrote:Only you can decide if the keyboard is as good as a real piano However, two things you have to consider; the touch, the pedals. None of them have got the sustain pedal to sound like the real thing. On touch, the ones with a real action are the best but like real actions they need to be regulated for time to time.


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markymark
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Post by markymark » 21 Jan 2008, 19:58

It's basically a service on the keyboard. Over years of use, the keys can lose some of their 'action' and need to be adjusted so that they return to the level of the keyboard in line with the others. If abused, the hammer action may need some attention. I have had problems in the past with the velocity sensors that measure the force being applied to the key. Bearing in mind, the digital piano was at least 15 years old at the time which is rather like a pensioner age in a digital piano's lifespan!

Digital instruments don't often need tuned. If they are being left in a room, like a conservatory for example, where the temperatures vary from extreme cold in winter to humid heat during the day, tuning may well become a slight issue. An acoustic piano is extremely sensitive as far as room climate is concerned and can be upset by even minor changes in temperature of humidity and of course, movement. Basically, if you look after your instrument, your digital piano will be very low maintenance.

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