How difficult is it to start teaching privately

Questions on learning to play the piano, and piano music.

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danh
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How difficult is it to start teaching privately

Post by danh » 24 Mar 2009, 14:18

Hello,

I'm wondering how difficult it is to start private music teaching from scratch. I did grade 8 on the piano quite a few years ago and am at a post grade 8 level now, I also play the flute and the cello but not to the same level. I've also got a first year of a music degree if that counts for anything, but I've got a really strong understanding of music theory. I've not got much teaching experience but I've got a lot of enthusiasm so I think I'll be good when I've built up some confidence.

My question is it realistic to dive straight into teaching, or would be best to get another job and start teaching part time? Also, what's the best way to arrange it, such as going to a school or to people's houses. And are there any must get qualifications?

I apologise, this is still a very new idea for me and I'm probably way off.

Thanks,
Dan

Gill the Piano
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Re: How difficult is it to start teaching privately

Post by Gill the Piano » 24 Mar 2009, 17:07

Get a CRB check - that helps a lot in today's media-fuelled paranoia. If you can visit homes to teach, you'll get a lot of grateful clients. On the minus side, you have to cope with traffic between houses and the chaos of the family when you get where you're going; make it clear that you don't want to be disturbed and that the sprog going off for 'a drink' or whatever is not acceptable, otherwise you find it happens as soon as sproggo realises that it's in for a rollocking for not practising. I have gleaned this from other visiting teachers. You need a firm policy on cancellations - on both sides. Read the posts from someone's mum on here to see the disruption caused by a teacher who doesn't turn up. Also consider your feelings if you get to a house to find that they're out or that little Tarquin 'doesn't feel like a lesson today'.
As for full/part-time, I'd consider the fact that most lessons go on after school hours. So you'll either need adults to fill in the days, or teach kids late into evenings when they're tired and dopey.
My remarks are based purely on observations of teachers and pupils - I don't teach as I haven't the time, patience or inclination! However, there are several experienced and very wise teachers haunting the forum; I'm sure they'll be able to help!
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markymark
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Re: How difficult is it to start teaching privately

Post by markymark » 28 Mar 2009, 17:40

This thread was covered before.

Click on this link for more information: http://www.uk-piano.org/piano-forums/vi ... f=7&t=5701

It was a while ago since the information was included, but it may be worth checking out again the stuff about teaching diplomas for instruments/voice.

davetheman
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Re: How difficult is it to start teaching privately

Post by davetheman » 22 Sep 2009, 00:00

Dan - ask yourself do you really want to teach kids that dont really wanna learn. You get frustrated and your passion for music can go out the window sometimes. You'll put alot of effort into the lessons and give it your all for alot of years then they'll quit. They wont even tell you why. I've taught piano for 20 years and i'm bored of it. You get a few good ones. Theres a lot of cowboy teachers out there. I know as all the students come to me. If you wanna be a good teach then you better be able to do the following.
1. classical (exams)
2.jazz (exams)
3.blues / country / gospel / latin etc etc.
4. play by ear -
5. reharmonization. - the good players will want more than just the classical music. Better pull that one out of the bag for them.
6. write songs (they'll ask you for compostiion help for GCSE music)
7. play guitar (exams) they'll get more fun out of it when you can jam along with them.
8. and finally but certainly not the least..........
have more than one way of teaching. I'm turning down work. Recession? what recession. I'm gonna sell my business to the highest bidder and move to Italy.........after i've written my book . you can read it someday :)

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Re: How difficult is it to start teaching privately

Post by joseph » 22 Sep 2009, 12:14

Wow Dave you've got some good points there.

To the original poster: It depends. If you are relying on this as your sole income then you'd better be able to do all those things. If you want to be a classical specialist, or a specialist in any particular type of music, your best bet is to train some more at music college and get a job in an institution.

Otherwise, get a job as an accountant and teach privately on the side. Be warned though, after a full day at work, do you REALLY want to teach those folk? I find it increasingly difficult to give a good private lesson after a day teaching at school.

IF you are determined, and you need the money you should probably look into teaching electronic keyboard (gasps of horror from all sides?). Another route to go down would be to get onto ebay and buy a 3 or 4 portable digital pianos, such as a Casio Privia, and give group piano lessons. Digital pianos have no doubt improved that side of the market and there is no reason, if you have the initial outlay, that you shouldn't cash in on that. You can charge less per hour and earn more per hour. IF it takes off, the keyboards will pay for themselves and more in no time. If there is no space in your home for this, use a church hall. They're usually pretty cheap and you could offer lessons to the church choir......

markymark
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Re: How difficult is it to start teaching privately

Post by markymark » 25 Sep 2009, 00:43

joseph wrote:IF you are determined, and you need the money you should probably look into teaching electronic keyboard (gasps of horror from all sides?). Another route to go down would be to get onto ebay and buy a 3 or 4 portable digital pianos, such as a Casio Privia, and give group piano lessons. Digital pianos have no doubt improved that side of the market and there is no reason, if you have the initial outlay, that you shouldn't cash in on that. You can charge less per hour and earn more per hour. IF it takes off, the keyboards will pay for themselves and more in no time. If there is no space in your home for this, use a church hall. They're usually pretty cheap and you could offer lessons to the church choir......
Gasps? I had to re-read the message - three times!

A very successful musician and professor in California called Mark Harrison does this type of studio teaching when training musicians in contemporary music styles. I thought about doing this myself but full time teaching came along.

One of the reasons that I do not teach secondary music is because I enjoy music too much. I teach primary level, very successfully, but co-ordinate music throughout the school. I train choirs and take the orchestra which is great but I couldn't be bothered doing that all day, everyday, five days a week! Private tuition is as far as I would want to go and even then, after teaching all day.... not for me at the moment.

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Re: How difficult is it to start teaching privately

Post by EarlMarsden » 29 Nov 2009, 06:56

I suggest starters must not work full time. This is since it may be difficult looking for students at this moment. A music teacher must first establish a name in the business and get recommendations before putting up his/her own private studio.
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zechariah1112
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Re: How difficult is it to start teaching privately

Post by zechariah1112 » 17 Oct 2010, 06:37

I learned how to play piano with online piano lessons you can find some great piano lessons here at http://learntoplaypianokeys.com/piano-courses.

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Re: How difficult is it to start teaching privately

Post by Sharma » 06 Jun 2011, 18:46

I started teaching privately a couple of years ago in London and things are going ok. The tricky thing is everyone tends to want lessons on weekday evenings, after school/work hours, so it's hard to fit in enough students. They biggest demand seems to be to teach children of middle class to wealthy families and they often require you to travel to them.

I've found that the internet is a drastically more effective way of advertising than any real world flyers. I spend house taking flyers round music shops and public centers and only can count one student that found me through one of those adds. Everything else is online.
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MarkGoodwinPianos
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Re: How difficult is it to start teaching privately

Post by MarkGoodwinPianos » 07 Jun 2011, 07:30

They biggest demand seems to be to teach children of middle class to wealthy families and they often require you to travel to them
Wealthy families have money to invest in their children. They'd rather downgrade the quality of their big annual holiday than cut off their kid's piano lessons. Therefore, put the price up for home visits. And don't be shy, put it up enough so that you feel happy, not unhappy, about making the journey.
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